Academics

Meet the Faculty

Meet the faculty of the Criminal Justice program.

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Meet the rest of the Criminal Justice "Team"

  • Burk Castleberry is a Lenawee County prosecutor in Adrian. Prior to his current position he served as an intern to Judge Margaret Noe for two years. He currently teaches Courtroom Demeanor and Techniques at our Jackson site. His advice to students in criminal justice: “If your passion is to be one of the good guys, there is not better area to work. Whether your choice is corrections, police, probation, prosecution, the career potential is unlimited in what you can do.”
  • Terry Collins is Chief of Police in Adrian. He has more than 25 years of experience in law enforcement and attended the 127th session of the FBI National Academy. He currently teaches Law Enforcement and Community policing on the Adrian campus. The course is taught as a seminar with focus on community criminal justice leaders. He has his B.A. in criminal justice, graduating from the first criminal justice class at Siena Heights.
  • Mary Jo Kennedy is retired from the Jackson City Police as a lieutenant. She has her M.A. in human resources from Eastern Michigan University. She also attended Northeastern University School of Police Staff and Command. Kennedy currently teaches the Law Enforcement and Community policing course. She has taught this course for more than 10 years. Her advice to students of criminal justice: “Focus your education on behavior and thinking. Think outside of the box. Problem-solving, strategic planning and using technology are areas that are expanding … keep your eye on that.”
  • Jonathon Kleinow works for the Department of Corrections as an outpatient therapist at Salvation Army Harbor Light. He is the supervisor/adjunct for the criminal justice internships. He oversees student work on the Adrian campus and SHU's site in Jackson. He received his B.A. in criminal justice and his M.A. in counseling from SHU. “If you want a career where you interact and work with people, this is the field. The criminal justice field is filled with the good, the bad, and the ugly, but nonetheless, the field of work where you can get the most satisfaction and reward for doing it well.”
  • Judge Margaret Noe has worked in the Lenawee County Court system for 24 years. She was a practicing attorney for 19 years; 14 of those years were as a prosecutor. She was a probate judge for four years and currently is a Circuit Court judge. Judge Noe has taught Courtroom Demeanor and Technique at SHU's Adrian campus for more than 18 years. “The criminal justice field, now more than ever, offers a solid, respectable, diversified profession. A career in criminal justice is not for the lazy, shortcut kind of people. It demands time, energy, integrity and loyalty. The personal rewards make it worth it.”
  • Brian Philson, is president and CEO of Highfields, a human services agency, which serves 11 counties in mid Michigan, since 2008. His agency helps thousands of children and families find a positive course. His agency also runs a residential program serving delinquent boys in Onondaga, Mich. Brian is also on the Michigan Committee of Juvenile Justice, a board member for multiple agencies and a national trainer and consultant. He has his B.A. in social work and M.S.W. from MSU. He currently teaches Juvenile Justice at SHU's Jackson site.
  • Ken Romanowski has 33 years working with the Michigan Department of Corrections. For the past 10 years he has been the warden of various state prisons in southeast Michigan. He is currently the warden at the Macomb Correctional Facility in New Haven. He has also worked as a manager and field agent in parole and probation and juvenile counselor at the detention center in Genesee County. He has his Ph.D. in guidance and counseling in community agencies from the University of Michigan. He has taught Introduction to Corrections at the Adrian campus for the last 5 years. “While we can never forget that we are dealing with potentially dangerous criminals, we must also remember that we are dealing with human beings.”
  • Judge Laura Schaedler was the first female prosecuting attorney in Lenawee County. For more than 27 years she was assigned all sexual assault cases. In addition to her public service she maintained a private practice for 31 years. She is currently a Lenawee County District Court Judge. Schaedler has taught Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice at the Adrian campus and SHU's Jackson site for the last 5 years. “In the study of current trends in the law it is important to understand the history behind those trends. Often our laws are based on events that took place years before a law is passed, and are furthered by current events.”
  • Judge James Sheridan is a Lenawee County District Court Judge. He has more than 30 years of experience in our Court system. He has taught Criminal Law at the Adrian campus and SHU's Jackson site for 35 years. Judge Sheridan has presented on a number of subjects at conferences and retreats across the U.S. and has testified before both Senate and House committees of the Michigan Legislature. He has also worked for legislative changes in criminal penalties and domestic violence bond conditions.
  • David Stadelman is a patrol sergeant for Jackson Police Department. He has 35 years of policing experience in numerous roles. He has his B.A. in public safety administration from Eckerd College and an M.A. in public administration from Western Michigan University. He is an adjunct teaching the Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice course at SHU's Jackson site.
  • George Truchan formerly served as Chief of Police in Adrian Township. He has more than 25 years of experience in law enforcement and is also an attorney in Adrian. He currently teaches Criminal Law and Comparative Criminal Justice Systems at SHU's Jackson site.
  • Carol Zawacki has worked in the field of substance abuse and mental health for 23 years. She is an RN, and has her master's degree in social work from the University of Michigan. She has worked collaboratively to provide services to the Lenawee County Court System and the Department of Transportation. She teaches the Drugs, Society and Criminal Justice course at SHUat Siena Heights University. “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.”

Meet Siena

Students

Tanya Chappell

Tanya Chappell

Community Services, SHU@LCC

Faculty & Staff

Donna Baker

Donna Baker

Associate Professor of Accounting; Chair, Accounting Department

Alumni

Tod Marshall, '90

Tod Marshall, '90

English and Philosophy Graduate; Award-Winning Poet; English Faculty Member, Gonzaga University
Contact Us at (800) 521-0009.
Siena Heights University Main Campus. 1247 E. Siena Heights Dr. Adrian, MI 49221.